Event Title

Reproducibility Symposium: Building Transparency into Research, Teaching, & Learning

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Standish Room, Science Library

Start Date

24-10-2019 9:00 AM

End Date

24-10-2019 1:00 PM

Description

Multiple disciplines across the social and natural sciences are facing replication crises, increasingly highlighting the importance of reproducibility and research transparency. This event is aimed at informing and supporting faculty, students, and staff in incorporating reproducibility into their research, teaching, and learning.

This two-day symposium will include UAlbany staff and faculty who are actively engaged with reproducibility efforts in their own work, as well as external guests who have developed projects that lower the bar for broader adoption of more reproducible scholarship: Matt Ingram, Associate Professor, Political Science, Nick Schiraldi, Data Analytics and Visualization Specialist, ITS, and Kevin Tyle, Senior Programmer Analyst, Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, from UAlbany; Norm Medeiros, Associate Librarian, and Richard Ball, Professor, Economics, from Haverford College; and Ivo Jimenez, PhD candidate, Computer Science, from UC Santa Cruz.

Norm Medeiros and Richard Ball represent Project TIER (Teaching Integrity in Empirical Research), an interdisciplinary organization at Haverford College that focuses on teaching reproducibility as part of the core curriculum of research methods. Ivo Jimenez represents Popper, a tool developed at UC Santa Cruz that automates reproducibility for computationally-intensive research projects.

The first day of the conference will consist of a public panel discussion geared toward introducing reproducibility to a general audience. The second day will consist of practical, hands-on workshops with both Project TIER and Popper. Taken together, this promises to increase the visibility of and create a community of practice around reproducibility on campus and, more globally, help spread practices conducive to research transparency.

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Oct 24th, 9:00 AM Oct 24th, 1:00 PM

Reproducibility Symposium: Building Transparency into Research, Teaching, & Learning

Standish Room, Science Library

Multiple disciplines across the social and natural sciences are facing replication crises, increasingly highlighting the importance of reproducibility and research transparency. This event is aimed at informing and supporting faculty, students, and staff in incorporating reproducibility into their research, teaching, and learning.

This two-day symposium will include UAlbany staff and faculty who are actively engaged with reproducibility efforts in their own work, as well as external guests who have developed projects that lower the bar for broader adoption of more reproducible scholarship: Matt Ingram, Associate Professor, Political Science, Nick Schiraldi, Data Analytics and Visualization Specialist, ITS, and Kevin Tyle, Senior Programmer Analyst, Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, from UAlbany; Norm Medeiros, Associate Librarian, and Richard Ball, Professor, Economics, from Haverford College; and Ivo Jimenez, PhD candidate, Computer Science, from UC Santa Cruz.

Norm Medeiros and Richard Ball represent Project TIER (Teaching Integrity in Empirical Research), an interdisciplinary organization at Haverford College that focuses on teaching reproducibility as part of the core curriculum of research methods. Ivo Jimenez represents Popper, a tool developed at UC Santa Cruz that automates reproducibility for computationally-intensive research projects.

The first day of the conference will consist of a public panel discussion geared toward introducing reproducibility to a general audience. The second day will consist of practical, hands-on workshops with both Project TIER and Popper. Taken together, this promises to increase the visibility of and create a community of practice around reproducibility on campus and, more globally, help spread practices conducive to research transparency.