Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3624-9188

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-2008

DOI

10.1111/j.1471-6402.2008.01473.x

Abstract

Prior research has demonstrated that self-blame is predictive of more PTSD symptoms and poorer recovery (Frazier, 2003; Koss, Figueredo, & Prince, 2002), and perceived control over recovery is associated with less distress (Frazier, 2003) in adult sexual assault (ASA) survivors. A structural equation model was tested to examine the role of traumatic events, self-blame, perceived control over recovery, and coping strategies on PTSD symptoms and self-rated recovery in women ASA survivors. Adaptive coping partially mediated the effects of other traumas, self-blame, and perceived control over recovery on PTSD symptoms, and showed a small positive association with increased PTSD symptoms. As hypothesized, maladaptive coping partially mediated the effects of other traumas, self-blame, and perceived control over recovery on both PTSD symptoms and self-rated recovery; greater maladaptive coping was associated with increased PTSD symptoms and lower self-rated recovery. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

Comments

This is the Author’s Original Manuscript of an article PTSD Symptoms and Self-Rated Recovery Among Adult Sexual Assault Survivors: The Effects of Traumatic Life Events and Psychosocial Variables by Sage Publications in Psychology of Women Quarterly . The version of the record appears here:10.1111/j.1471-6402.2008.01473.x.

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