Title

Risk and Protective Factors for Child Neglect During Early Childhood: A Cross-Study Comparison

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2011

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2011.04.024

Abstract

The present analysis relies upon data from three separate longitudinal studies to identify risk and protective factors associated with subsequent neglect during early childhood. All three studies (Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing [FFCW]; Healthy Families New York [HFNY]; Illinois Families Study-Child Wellbeing [IFS]) involve probabilistic samples or subsamples of low-income families with young children. Multivariate logistic regressions predicting official reports of investigated neglect allegations and a dichotomous indicator of neglect from the Parent–child Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS-PC) were conducted separately for each study, using common sets of predictors derived from baseline or initial survey waves. Across the three studies, consistencies emerged with respect to the predictors of both neglect outcomes. Specifically, consistencies emerged related to indicators of economic resources and hardships, parent well-being, and parenting. Understanding the predictors of child neglect is of critical importance to the development of child maltreatment prevention strategies since a clearer understanding of the risk and protective factors associated with neglect would enable more effectively targeted and tailored interventions. The present analysis relies upon data from three separate longitudinal studies to identify risk and protective factors associated with subsequent neglect during early childhood. All three studies (Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing [FFCW]; Healthy Families New York [HFNY]; Illinois Families Study-Child Wellbeing [IFS]) involve probabilistic samples or subsamples of low-income families with young children. Multivariate logistic regressions predicting official reports of investigated neglect allegations and a dichotomous indicator of neglect from the Parent–child Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS-PC) were conducted separately for each study, using common sets of predictors derived from baseline or initial survey waves. Across the three studies, consistencies emerged with respect to the predictors of both neglect outcomes. Specifically, consistencies emerged related to indicators of economic resources and hardships, parent well-being, and parenting. Understanding the predictors of child neglect is of critical importance to the development of child maltreatment prevention strategies since a clearer understanding of the risk and protective factors associated with neglect would enable more effectively targeted and tailored interventions.

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