Event Title

Keynote: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship, and Civic Engagement

Location

Standish Room, Science Library

Start Date

11-10-2019 9:45 AM

End Date

11-10-2019 10:45 AM

Description

Abstract:

Critics of the digital humanities have often asked whether the fruits of that work are "scholarship." Scholarship, they suggest, requires argument, and as a form digital media seems a comparatively ill fit for presenting and substantiating interpretative argument. Whether that continues to be a fair critique or not, this presentation will ask whether this challenge is from another angle an important opportunity to contribute to a different but no less vital kind of work. Using the reception and reuses of "Mapping Inequality" as examples, this presentation will explore how digital humanities scholarship can be a form of civic engagement where humanists can engage their fellow citizens, as well as their professional colleagues, in more open-ended, ongoing, collaborative conversations.

Presenter Information

Dr. Robert K. Nelson is the director of the Digital Scholarship Lab. His current research uses a text-mining technique called topic modeling to uncover themes and reveal historical patterns in massive amounts of text from the Civil War era. He is currently completing two projects from this research. One is a digital project that will publish and analyze multiple topic models of Civil War-era archives including the Richmond Daily Dispatch and the New York Times. The other is an essay that analyzes these models to produce a comparative analysis of Union and Confederate nationalism and patriotism.

To learn more about Robert K. Nelson go here: https://americanstudies.richmond.edu/faculty/rnelson2/

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Oct 11th, 9:45 AM Oct 11th, 10:45 AM

Keynote: Digital Humanities, Digital Scholarship, and Civic Engagement

Standish Room, Science Library

Abstract:

Critics of the digital humanities have often asked whether the fruits of that work are "scholarship." Scholarship, they suggest, requires argument, and as a form digital media seems a comparatively ill fit for presenting and substantiating interpretative argument. Whether that continues to be a fair critique or not, this presentation will ask whether this challenge is from another angle an important opportunity to contribute to a different but no less vital kind of work. Using the reception and reuses of "Mapping Inequality" as examples, this presentation will explore how digital humanities scholarship can be a form of civic engagement where humanists can engage their fellow citizens, as well as their professional colleagues, in more open-ended, ongoing, collaborative conversations.